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All Party Parliamentary Group on Housing and Care for Older People

All Party Parliamentary Group on Housing and Care for Older People

The APPG on Housing and Care for Older People organises an Inquiry every two years. These have often taken forward the work begun
by the Housing for an Ageing Population Panel for Innovation (HAPPI); the last two inquiries have covered Rural Housing for an Ageing
Population (HAPPI 4) and Rental Housing for an Ageing Population (HAPPI 5) – All the recent APPG Inquiry reports can be found at: www.housinglin.org.uk/HAPPI

APPG Inquiry: Housing for those living with Dementia

There are currently around 850,000 people with dementia in the UK, according to the Alzheimer’s Society. This is projected to rise to
1.6 million by 2040. Two thirds of these are not living in residential care but in their own accommodation, and our study will consider
the policies and practices that can enhance independence and quality of life. 

For 2020, the Officers of the APPG have decided to establish an Inquiry on “Housing for those living with Dementia”.

Launched on 13 May 2020, there will be four Inquiry sessions over the course of this year. Expert ‘witnesses’ will present at each session.
These will cover dementia-friendly design/development of new homes, changes and adaptations to existing properties, ongoing input of
care and support, including consideration of innovations in technological support. We intend to produce a report in March 2021 which:

  • makes recommendations to central and local government and other key players
  • provides guidance and stimulates interest for housing providers with an interest in older people


Published: 22nd May 2020

Source: Housing LIN

Page URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/Topics/browse/HousingandDementia/appg-inquiry-housing-and-dementia/

Coronavirus Info Hub

Coronavirus Info Hub

With the escalating incidence of coronavirus in the UK, it is essential that those working in our sector are fully aware
of the seriousness of COVID-19 and the risk to both our own lives and the public at large.

Whether operating or commissioning specialist or supported housing for older and vulnerable adults, ‘Info Hub’ is
split into three sections that signpost to relevant Housing LIN practice briefings, national government guidelines and
other useful information for our sector so you can be kept up-to-date of this rapidly evolving situation, access
support and take appropriate measures.

Visit other Health Intel topic pages for further resources on health and housing. There is also a simple-to-use online 
Health Exchange functionality on this site where you can give a brief description of and post other documents you
have come across that you consider have aided your learning and are vital reading, both on coronavirus and health
and housing generally.

And with coronavirus putting incredible pressure on the way person-centred and/or property services are delivered
safely into the homes of people who have a care and support need, contact us to discuss how we may help you in
these uncertain times.


Click Here to visit the page for Housing LIN resources, Government guidelines and advice, and other useful links.


Published: 14th April 2020

Source: Housing LIN

Page URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/Topics/browse/HealthandHousing/coronavirus-info-hub/

Design Guidelines for inclusive, enabling environments for adults with complex needs

Design Guidelines for inclusive, enabling environments for adults with complex needs

Written by Archadia Chartered Architects and Planners, this Housing LIN Viewpoint considers the current standards and typologies of specialist supported housing provision for people with profound and multiple learning disabilities.

It aims to reflect on several case studies by Archadia in both refurbishment and new build projects. Owing to evidence which suggests there is a lack of relevant design guidance; this viewpoint provides recommendations for further research needed in this area.

It calls for a collaborative approach to change legislation and planning to help create an environment where profound and multiple learning disability (PMLD) housing is more easily developed, funded and maintained.

You can find more information about housing for people with learning disabilities and autism, including case studies and reports, by visiting the Housing LIN’s Learning Disabilities topic page.

The Housing LIN can advise and support your organisation to transform your services and improve housing choices for people with complex needs, including people with a learning disability or autism. Find out more by reading their Transforming Care brochure.

Published: 23rd January 2020

Source: Housing LIN

Story URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/Topics/type/Design-Guidelines-for-inclusive-enabling-environments-for-adults-with-complex-needs/

PDF Link: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Resources/Housing/Support_materials/Viewpoints/HLINViewpoint_98_DesignGuidelines.pdf

UK Homes to Become ‘Hospital Wards of the Future’, says Home Instead CEO

UK Homes to Become ‘Hospital Wards of the Future’, says Home Instead CEO

UK homes will become the “hospital wards of the future” as the population ages and more people opt for domiciliary care services, the CEO of Home Instead Senior Care UK has said.

Speaking to Home Care Insight, Martin Jones said the social care sector must “prepare for the reality” that people are living for longer and will require more support to remain living well and independently at home.

According to the Office of National Statistics, the number of people living in the UK aged 85 and over will double over the next 25 years. (Link to Homecare Insight)

I think we are going to start to see people wake up to the fact that people’s homes are going to be the hospital wards of the future. It’s a setting that will foster overall health, wellbeing and independence. And, let’s not forget that ‘home’ is where the majority of people want to be,” Jones said.

Bear in mind that a 9-year-old today has a one-in-two chance of living to at least 105 years old – and this is the reality that we need, as a sector, to prepare for.

Jones has also predicted that the use of technology will become more prevalent in the home care sector over the next 12 months.

For me, the key theme for 2020 and indeed the decade ahead will be the intersection of high-tech and high-touch and how we embrace technology as we address the challenges of an ageing world.

The Home Instead CEO said 2020 will also see more collaboration between business and healthcare for the “greater good” of the ageing population.

This is already in action through the work of some of our franchise owners, who have been working with the NHS to prevent hospital admissions through falls and the statistics are staggering in terms of savings on ambulance call outs, A&E visits and hospital stays,” he added.

There really are so many health issues and incidents that can be dealt with in people’s homes – if we put the right training and systems in place.


Published: 16th January 2020

Source: Homecare Insight

Story URL: https://www.homecareinsight.co.uk/exclusive-uk-homes-to-become-hospital-wards-of-the-future-says-home-instead-ceo/?utm_source=Email+Campaign&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=47367-322582-Home+Care+Insight+DNA+-+2020-01-31

Older People’s Housing Champions’ home adaptations “Challenge Checklist”

Older People’s Housing Champions’ home adaptations “Challenge Checklist”

The Older People’s Housing Champions have launched their latest guide for the ‘non-expert’, Help with home adaptations: Improving local services.

This guide includes a ‘Home Adaptation Challenge Checklist’, a list of possible questions that anyone with an interest in improving delivery of home adaptations will find useful in discussions with local providers.

It will help members of Older People’s Forums, Councillors and disabled people’s groups to work with their councils to review local provision, e.g. helping speed up the time it takes to install home adaptations and adopting best practice.


Published: November 2019

Source: Home Adaptations Consortium

Page URL: https://homeadaptationsconsortium.wordpress.com/good-practice/

A Strengths Based Approach to Delivering the Disabled Facilities Grant – Thurrock Council

A Strengths Based Approach to Delivering the Disabled Facilities Grant – Thurrock Council

An accessible and well-adapted home can enable an adult or child with a disability to remain in their home for longer, with dignity and with pride, and the earlier this is achieved, the sooner the benefits can be realised.

Such benefits have long been recognised in Thurrock, and with the Care Act 2014 shifting the focus to early interventions that offer a more preventative approach to supporting people, the preventative benefits of accessible home adaptations were also anticipated.

This case study outlines how Thurrock Council OT and Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) service team have adopted a strength based approach to delivering DFGs to enhance individual’s independence and provide overall improvements to their health and wellbeing.

This approach shares the virtues set out in the Royal College of Occupational Therapists’ recent guide, Adaptations without Delay: A guide to planning and delivering home adaptations differently, written by the Housing LIN.

Or click to download a .pdf copy below.


Published: 13th August 2019

Source: Housing LIN

Story URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/Topics/type/A-strengths-based-approach-to-delivering-the-Disabled-Facilities-Grant-Thurrock-Council/

PDF Link: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Resources/Housing/Practice_examples/Housing_LIN_case_studies/HLIN_CaseStudy_155_DFG-Thurrock.pdf

Going the Extra Step: A Compendium of Best Practice in Dementia Care

Going the Extra Step: A Compendium of Best Practice in Dementia Care

Preventing unwanted isolation and loneliness for people with dementia living in housing with care.


The Housing Learning and Improvement Network used this year’s Dementia Action Week 2019 to gather and share examples of extra care schemes and other housing related community services supporting people with dementia to develop meaningful relationships.

These relationships can reduce social isolation and loneliness. The examples provided range from informal arrangements supported by staff or other residents to formal service provision.

This compendium brings those examples together in one place, along with further examples of best practice that we received during Dementia Action Week. Colleagues also told us about the fantastic work they were doing as Dementia Friendly organisations, and we have included a section of those examples as well.

Or click to download a .pdf copy below.


Published: 29th July 2019

Source: Housing LIN

Story URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/Topics/type/Going-the-Extra-Step-A-compendium-of-best-practice-in-dementia-care/

PDF Link: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Resources/Housing/Support_materials/Reports/HLIN_CaseStudyReport_DAW19-Compendium.pdf

Housing and Ageing Alliance 2019 Manifesto

Housing and Ageing Alliance 2019 Manifesto

The Housing and Ageing Alliance has published its 2019 manifesto.

The manifesto builds on three proposals that inform its policy recommendations:

  • To enable older people to live independently and well wherever they choose, remaining in control of their homes and lives;
  • To create age-friendly homes, neighbourhoods and services that enable people to live healthy, fulfilling lives, involved with families, friends & neighbours and contributing to their communities in later life;
  • To create integrated housing, health & care policies all aiming to enable people to live safely & well at home as they age.


Click to download a .pdf copy below.


Published: 22nd July 2019

Source: Housing LIN

Story URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/News/Housing-and-Ageing-Alliance-publishes-2019-manifesto/

PDF Link: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Resources/Housing/OtherOrganisation/Hsg-Ageing-Alliance-Manifesto-2019.pdf

Adaptations Without Delay

Adaptations Without Delay


The benefits of adapting the home are recognised as an effective way to improve the health and wellbeing of older people, and disabled adults and children.

Housing LIN – Adaptions Without Delay

A more accessible home environment can improve independence, reduce risk and reduce reliance on assistance. As the body of evidence demonstrating the benefits of home adaptations grows, so does the recognition that the sooner they are installed, the greater will be the preventative benefits.

The primary purpose of this guide is to address delays in the delivery of all types of adaptations (minor and major) across all tenures that occur when people receive a disproportionate response to their need for an adaptation. Delays in installing adaptations can increase the risk of health and social care needs developing or increasing. A person waiting for an occupational therapy assessment where the situation and need for an adaptation is relatively simple and straightforward should therefore be avoided.

Click below to download a .pdf copy.


Published: 14th June 2019

Source: Housing LIN

Story URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/Topics/type/Adaptations-Without-Delay/

PDF Link(s): https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Resources/Housing/Support_materials/Other_reports_and_guidance/Adaptations-Without-Delay.pdf

https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Resources/Housing/OtherOrganisation/RCOT-AWD-Cymru-final.pdf

Forecast for Accessible Homes: Accessible Housing in Local Plans

Forecast for Accessible Homes: Accessible Housing in Local Plans


England is in dire need of more housing. The government has responded with a variety of initiatives aiming to increase and speed up supply, with the ambitious aim of delivering 300,000 new homes per year.

However, as our population ages and rates of disability increase, it is clear that to meet housing needs adequately, it is vital that we ensure the accessibility and adaptability of new homes is sufficient to meet the needs of our diverse population. Without this, disabled and older people will be increasingly excluded from ordinary aspects of daily living with negative consequences for individuals, families, communities and public services.

At present only 7% of our homes in England provide the four basic accessibility criteria to be deemed ‘visitable’ according to the English Housing Survey. Yet there are 13.9 million disabled people in the UK, with numbers continuing to rise. The NHS estimates there are 1.2m wheelchair users in the UK. Failing to address the deficit in the number of accessible and adaptable homes would mean storing up a housing crisis of a different kind if the new homes we build are not able to meet the needs of the population both now and in the future.

The analysis that Habinteg has carried out and presents in this report builds a picture of the extent to which local plans in England are set to deliver homes fit for the future.


Or click below to download a .pdf copy.


Habingteg’s Findings

Less than a third of the local plans analysed set out a requirement to use current accessible housing standards.

During this study 322 draft and adopted local plans were identified and reviewed. The analysis shows that:

  • Less than half of all plans (138) set a specific requirement for a proportion of new homes to meet any form of accessible housing standards.
  • Outside London under a quarter (23%) of new homes due to be built by 2030 are planned to be accessible
  • Just 1% of new homes outside London are set to be suitable for wheelchair users despite 1.2 million wheelchair users in the UK and a rapidly ageing population.
  • There is a postcode lottery in the supply of new accessible and adaptable homes. By 2030 there will only be one accessible new home built for every 270 people in the West Midlands, one accessible new home for every 52 people in the East of England, and one accessible new home for every 24 people in London.

Infographic – Habinteg

Habinteg’s Recommendations

Having reviewed our findings and taken account of the challenges faced by local planning authorities, Habinteg are calling for action at both a national and local level.

Habinteg is calling on the government to:

  • Set the ‘accessible adaptable’ standard – M4(2) Category 2 as the new mandatory baseline, as it is in London.
  • Ensure the Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government (MHCLG) issue new guidance to local planning authorities on how they should reflect the housing needs of older and disabled people in their plans as set out in the Neighbourhood Planning Act 2017 – which has not yet been issued.

Habinteg is calling on Local Authorities to:

  • Set a defined percentage of new homes to be built to current accessible standards

Find out more

  1. Read the report
  2. See the case studies
  3. Full references list
  4. Download social media graphics


Published: June 2019

Source: Habinteg

Story Link: https://www.habinteg.org.uk/localplans/

PDF URL: https://www.habinteg.org.uk/download.cfm?doc=docm93jijm4n2151.pdf&ver=2575

Holding Back the Years – The Rise of Retirement Villages

Holding Back the Years – The Rise of Retirement Villages

A new report from Winckworth Sherwood analysing the demand for retirement villages.


While retirement communities are common in the USA and Australia, the UK has not seen demand for these types of communities preferring instead small-scale complexes.

This report, commissioned by Winckworth Sherwood and the Housing LIN, explores the views, concerns, hopes and aspirations of those developing, funding and living in retirement homes and communities, and asks about the future of retirement villages in the UK.


Published: 11th December 2018

Source: Housing LIN

Story URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/Topics/type/Holding-Back-the-Years-The-Rise-of-Retirement-Villages/

PDF Link: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Resources/Housing/OtherOrganisation/Retirement-villages-2018_2019.pdf

Age-Friendly Housing: Future Design for Older People

Age-Friendly Housing: Future Design for Older People


Age-Friendly Housing: Future design for older people, by RIBA bookshop, sets a new bar for the design of future housing for an ageing population. It reminds us that when we consider the hopes and needs of ‘older’ people, we are talking not about ‘other people’, but about ourselves.

Longer lifetimes are now a well-documented, global phenomenon. In 2016, 18% of UK citizens were aged 65 or above. By 2036, this is expected to rise to 25% in half of all local authorities in the UK.

Written by Julia Park, leading architect and researcher, and Jeremy Porteus, national expert in housing for older people, Age-Friendly Housing explores the significant progress that has taken place over the last decade and considers what more should be done.

Building on the influential HAPPI report  published in 2009, it focuses on anticipating the needs and aspirations of the next generation of older people, the book touches on what this implies for our communities, towns and cities, as well as living spaces – illustrating the links between housing, health and social care. 

Age-Friendly Housing features mainly new build housing, with a dedicated section on adaptation and refurbishment. Bringing together a wide range of informed perspectives on the subject, the book outlines the underlying design principles to be applied and the early decisions to be taken, using the case studies and contributions of some of the top names in the field to detail examples of best practice. In doing so, Park and Porteus have created a resource that will inform and empower architects, designers, planners and clients to be braver and wiser in designing with older people in mind.

Jeremy Porteus commented:
Our ageing population demands that we have aradical rethink in the way we design and build our homes to meet our future needs and lifestyle choices. In this publication, we have captured how this can be achieved in both mainstream and specialist housing for older people, drawing on inspiring innovative examples from home and abroad.

Discussing the book, Julia Park said:
We hope that it represents a major step forward in the debate about how we can live better, as we live longer.


#agefriendlyhousing

Published: 10th July 2018

Source: Housing LIN

Story URL: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/Topics/type/RIBA-age-friendly-housing/

PDF Link: https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Events/2018-07/Age-Friendly-Housing_-_Further-Reading_updated_July_2019.pdf

Housing and Disabled People: Britain’s Hidden Crisis

Housing and Disabled People: Britain’s Hidden Crisis

The housing inquiry looks at the current provision of accessible and adaptable housing for disabled people provided by local authorities and registered landlords.

Disabled people have a right to independent living. We wanted to find out to what extent this right was being fulfilled in the context of housing.

The report found that:

  • disabled people are too often demoralised and frustrated by the housing system
  • there is a significant shortage of accessible homes
  • installing home adaptations involves unacceptable bureaucracy and delay
  • disabled people are not getting the support that they need to live independently

The report recommends that more adaptable homes are built for disabled people and that local and national governments engage with disabled people at planning stages.

You can also watch the British Sign Language (BSL) version of the executive summary on YouTube

Or click to download a .pdf copy below.


Alternative versions:

Easy Read Format

Welsh Language


Published: 11th May 2018

Source: Equality and Human Rights Commission

Story URL: https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/publication-download/housing-and-disabled-people-britains-hidden-crisis

PDF Link: https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/sites/default/files/housing-and-disabled-people-britains-hidden-crisis-main-report_0.pdf

Housing our Ageing Population

Housing our Ageing Population


Learning from councils meeting the housing need for our ageing population.


There is a distinct and urgent need to better provide a range of housing options to meet the wide variety of housing circumstances, aspirations and needs of people as they age.

Between 2008 and 2039, 74 per cent of projected household growth will be made up of households with someone aged 65 or older. The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS.

This report sets out in detail what is required to meet the housing needs of our ageing population and how councils around the country are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing.


Or click the download button below.


Published: 8th September 2017

Source: Local Government Association

Story URL: https://www.local.gov.uk/housing-our-ageing-population