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Airline Cabin Crew to Join NHS Nightingale Carers

Airline Cabin Crew to Join NHS Nightingale Carers

The NHS has enlisted easyJet and Virgin Atlantic to work alongside NHS clinicians at new Nightingale hospitals as part
of the fight against coronavirus.

The airlines are asking staff who have not been working since the COVID-19 pandemic grounded some planes to consider
helping the thousands of doctors, nurses and other medics at the new hospitals being built across the country.

EasyJet has already written to all 9,000 of its UK based staff, which includes 4,000 cabin crew who are trained in CPR,
while Virgin Atlantic will write to approximately 4,000 of their employees from Monday (30 March), prioritising those with
the required skills and training.

Those who sign up will perform support roles, under the close instruction of nurses and senior clinicians on the wards at
the NHS Nightingale Hospitals across the country.

The NHS has confirmed that the new hospitals are being built in London, Birmingham and Manchester and other sites are
being considered should the need arise.

Support workers will work alongside experienced clinicians, changing beds, doing other non-clinical tasks and helping
doctors and nurses working on the wards.

Ruth May, chief nursing officer for England, said: “Nurses, doctors and other vital health and social care staff are working
day and night to provide the best possible care to patients as the NHS continues to fight this global health pandemic.

“The NHS is mobilising like never before, but the scale of this challenge has not been seen in peacetime so we need all the
support we can get.

“Thousands of nurses, medics and other expert staff are returning to work alongside us, but we need everyone to do their
bit – whether that is working in one of our current health or social care services, working in the Nightingale Hospital,
volunteering to help the NHS or following government advice to stay at home, protect the NHS and save lives.”

St John Ambulance are supplying hundreds of volunteers to help staff the first Nightingale hospital at the ExCeL centre in
London.

Many airline staff are first aid trained or hold other clinical qualifications as well as being security cleared, while NHS
clinicians will oversee their work – with expert training provided to all new recruits when they sign-up.

Tina Milton, Director of Cabin Services for easyJet, said: “We have all needed the NHS at some point in our lives and so
we are so proud that our crew can now help to support the NHS at this crucial time.

“The NHS is at the forefront of dealing with this health emergency but the training and skills our cabin crew have, working
closely with the medical professionals, could help make a real difference.”

Corneel Koster, Chief Customer Officer at Virgin Atlantic, said: “We are very grateful to the NHS for everything they are doing
in extremely challenging circumstances and we’re committed to doing all we can to support the national effort against the
rapid acceleration of Covid-19.”

“We are very proud of our highly skilled people at Virgin Atlantic and since the Government’s Coronavirus Job Retention
Scheme was announced, we have been inundated with our employees looking to help other organisations at this time of
crisis. The NHS approached us with this unique opportunity as they recognise the value and experience our medically trained
cabin crew and trainers will bring to the incredible Nightingale Hospital initiative.”

“In addition, our cargo business is very busy with extra flights, keeping global supply chains running and transporting
essential medical supplies into the UK at this time.

Staff and volunteers working at the new hospitals will also be offered free accommodation. Those staying in the hotels will
have breakfast provided and lunch or dinner depending on the shifts that they are working.


Published: 30th March 2020

Source: NHS England

Page URL: https://www.england.nhs.uk/2020/03/airline-cabin-crew-to-join-nhs-nightingale-carers/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NHSCBoard+%28NHS+England%29

Find Local Authority Adult Social Care services

Find Local Authority Adult Social Care services

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NHS A-Z of Topics

NHS A-Z of Topics

Funding announced for more Changing Places toilets in NHS hospitals

Funding announced for more Changing Places toilets in NHS hospitals

A total of £500,000 has been made available to 10 trusts across England today to start work on 16 new facilities, with an additional £1.5 million available to bid for.

Thousands of severely disabled people will benefit from the new funding, which is expected to more than double the number of Changing Places toilets in NHS hospitals across England.

Changing Places are toilets that are equipped for people who are not able to use the toilet self-reliantly, including adult-sized changing benches and hoists.

Currently there are just over 50 of these facilities on the NHS England estate. This is the first share of funding and it is expected that the final number of Changing Places in hospitals will eventually increase to over 100.

The Minister for Care, Caroline Dinenage, is calling for more trusts to bid for the funding and also for all new hospital facilities to include a Changing Places facility in their plans.

People with severe disabilities, such as muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy and multiple sclerosis, and their carers say Changing Places facilities can be life changing and allow them to go out in public or attend hospital appointments without fear or stress.

The difficulties faced by carers and disabled people in the absence of Changing Places facilities range from having to be changed on a dirty toilet floor, reducing their time out of the housing and restricting their social lives.

The announcement of funding forms part of cross-government work to improve accessibility. The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) consulted last year on proposals that would add Changing Places toilets to more than 150 new buildings a year, including shopping centres, supermarkets, cinemas, stadiums and darts venues.  

“Changing Places change lives and should be in place in every NHS hospital for dignity, for safety, for comfort. I’m pleased the government is taking action to improve accessibility and hope more trusts apply for funding and have a Changing Places facility built at their hospital.”

You can find out where the funding is being distributed here.

Published: 24th January 2020

Source: National Health Executive

Story URL: http://www.nationalhealthexecutive.com/Health-Care-News/funding-announced-for-more-changing-places-toilets-in-nhs-hospitals-?utm_source=National%20Health%20Executive&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=11260225_NHE%20Newsletter%20Week4%20Jan20&dm_i=IJV,6PCG1,VQFEUD,QR6MN,1

Rapid NHS Response Teams to Help People Stay Well at Home

Rapid NHS Response Teams to Help People Stay Well at Home

Expert rapid response teams will be on hand within two hours to help support older people to remain well at home and avoid
hospital admissions, under new plans outlined by the NHS today.

Local health service and council teams will begin the roll out of Urgent Community Response teams from April, as part of the 
NHS’ Long Term Plan to support England’s ageing population and those with complex needs.

The teams will give those who need it fast access to a range of qualified professionals who can address both their health and
social care needs, including physiotherapy and occupational therapy, medication prescribing and reviews, and help with staying
well-fed and -hydrated.

Backed by £14million of investment, seven ‘accelerator’ sites will be the first to deliver the new standards for care, working
together to standardise how urgent community services will be measured, and delivered consistently across the country, 365
days a year.

Older people and adults with complex health needs who have a very urgent care need, including a risk of being hospitalised, will
be able to access a response from a team of skilled professionals within two hours, to provide the care they need to remain
independent.

A two day standard will also apply for teams to put in place tailored packages of intermediate care, or reablement services, for
individuals in their own homes, with the aim of restoring independence and confidence after a hospital stay.

The urgent response standards are part of a range of commitments – including enhanced NHS support to care homes – which
local health and care leaders will be rolling out over the next few years to help keep older people well at home and reduce
pressure on hospital services.

NHS chief executive, Sir Simon Stevens, said:
“The NHS working hand in glove in the community with council-funded social care services can be the difference between an
older person or someone with long-term health needs spending a week or a month on a ward – or getting the right help early so
they don’t need to go to hospital in the first place.

“That’s why as part of our Long Term Plan for the NHS we are putting community services front and centre, and backing them
with a growing share of the NHS budget – and putting in place these new standards will give people and their families peace of
mind about what they can expect from their local services when they need help most.”

NHS teams in seven parts of the country will begin working with their local authority counterparts on developing the services
and recruiting staff from April, with the ambition that at least three areas will be fully up and running by next winter.

Further areas across England will receive extra funding to begin working to the new standards from 2021, with every part of the
country covered by April 2023.

This will be supported by an additional £4.5billion a year for primary care and community services by 2023/24.

Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Hancock, said: “Long, avoidable hospital stays can be particularly distressing
for older people and can strip them of their independence – something we absolutely must prevent.

“So we are rolling out this innovative new approach which will help treat our ageing population in the comfort of their own
homes, helping them live independent lives for longer. This is a key part of the NHS Long Term Plan, backed by record
investment in the NHS, and we are committed to making sure this translates to better, safer care in the community.”

Shifting more care out of hospital and into the community is the first of five major improvements in how the changing health
needs of the country will be met over the coming decade to be set out in the NHS Long Term Plan last year.

Matthew Winn, NHS Director of Community Health and Chief Executive of Cambridgeshire Community Services NHS Trust said:
“For the first time in its 71-year history, NHS national plans prioritise community health services, providing a genuine opportunity
to do something different when caring for people facing a health crisis at home.

“We have committed to ensure all patients in England get the right community care, in a timely manner when they need it most
by 2023/24.”

Reablement services aim to help people, particularly older people, remain independent by:

providing support and rehabilitation to people at risk of admission to, or who have been in, hospital;

  • helping make their transfer out of hospital as smooth as possible;
  • ensuring people can remain in their own home for as long as possible, and;
  • offering short-term support to people living at home who find daily activities difficult.

Studies show the services – provided by teams made up of a range of professionals such as nurses, physiotherapists,
occupational therapists, social workers and social care staff – are highly effective in helping people regain or maintain their
independence.

As well as being better for the individuals involved, it’s more cost-effective for the NHS than providing care in hospital, and
also means beds can be made available more quickly for patients who need them.

Health and social care systems across the country already work hard to support people at home, putting in place personalised
packages of care including physiotherapy, nursing care, and occupational therapy.

However, up to now the NHS hasn’t set national expectations or strategy, meaning that there is wide variation in how these
services are delivered across the country.

At present, no part of the country is consistently delivering community urgent care services 365 days a year in line with these new
national standards – meaning that all areas are expected to see a significant improvement in the offer to local people.

Seven ‘accelerator’ sites have been selected to develop the two hour/two day NHS standards, and include partnerships of
providers of community health services, NHS commissioners, councils and adult social care teams, and 111 and ambulance
services.

They are:

  • Warrington Together (Cheshire and Merseyside STP);
  • West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership (Kirklees);
  • Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland system;
  • Cornwall system;
  • Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire system;
  • South East London system; and
  • Norfolk and Waveney system

Helen Childs, Chief Operating Officer at NHS Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group, said:
“Locally, one in four people are over the age of 65; and we know that historically we haven’t always provided them with the best
outcome because we weren’t able to provide rapid, timely access to short term community services. Today’s announcement will
allow us to accelerate our plans to support older people at home.

“This will be better for our patients, their families and also means that hospital beds are available as soon as possible for the
people who need these very specialist services and expertise.”

Jon Wilson, Director of Adult and Communities, Leicestershire County Council, said:
“We are very excited locally about the opportunity that this investment gives us to bring together NHS and social care services to
deliver integrated personalised care for people.  Our partnership work aims to enable people to return home from hospital as soon
as they can and to stay at home avoiding an admission to hospital, wherever possible.

“By providing a single point of access into health and care service for people who may be experiencing a crisis, or require additional
care quickly, can vastly improve their outcomes and helps to support their families.”


Published: 23rd January 2020

Source: NHS UK

Page URL: https://www.england.nhs.uk/2020/01/rapid-nhs-response-teams-to-help-people-stay-well-at-home/

Guidance on the legal rights to have personal health budgets and personal wheelchair budgets

Guidance on the legal rights to have personal health budgets and personal wheelchair budgets

A change in the law means two new groups have a legal right to a personal health budget. This includes people eligible for after-care services under section 117 of the Mental Health Act and people eligible for an NHS wheelchair (who have a right to a personal wheelchair budget). NHS England has issued guidance for CCGs and other bodies.

This guidance document supports clinical commissioning groups and other relevant bodies to meet their duty to ensure eligible groups of people benefit from the legal right to have a personal health budget or personal wheelchair budget. This includes people eligible for NHS Continuing Healthcare, children and young people’s continuing care, people eligible for after-care services under section 117 of the Mental Health Act, and people in receipt of NHS wheelchairs.

Published: 13th September 2019

Source: NHS England

Story URL: https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/guidance-on-the-legal-rights-to-have-personal-health-budgets-and-personal-wheelchair-budgets/

NHS Long Term Plan

NHS Long Term Plan

The NHS is one of Britain’s greatest achievements and for 70 years its dedicated staff has been there for us.
A lot has changed since it was created in 1948, and today the NHS is responding to changes in society that were never expected, let alone planned for.

The Government has announced additional funding for the NHS and this means we can plan to make the NHS fit for the future for patients, their families and our staff.

The NHS Long Term Plan will make sure the NHS has a bright future ahead of it. We know that families work hard to pay their taxes and that’s why we will make sure every penny is invested on the things that matter most, from providing high quality lifesaving treatment and care for our patients and their families, to reducing pressure on our hard working NHS staff and investing in exciting new technologies.

The NHS Long Term Plan was developed in partnership with those who know the NHS best – frontline health and care staff, patients and their families and other experts.


Published: 21st August 2019

Source: NHS UK

Page URL: https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/about/

NHS Long Term Plan – Summary

NHS Long Term Plan – Summary

The NHS is one of Britain’s greatest achievements and for 70 years its dedicated staff has been there for us.
A lot has changed since it was created in 1948, and today the NHS is responding to changes in society that were never expected, let alone planned for.

The Government has announced additional funding for the NHS and this means we can plan to make the NHS fit for the future for patients, their families and our staff.

The NHS Long Term Plan will make sure the NHS has a bright future ahead of it. We know that families work hard to pay their taxes and that’s why we will make sure every penny is invested on the things that matter most, from providing high quality lifesaving treatment and care for our patients and their families, to reducing pressure on our hard working NHS staff and investing in exciting new technologies.

Read the brief summary to find out what the NHS Long Term Plan will deliver for patients and an overview of the key things you can expect to see and hear about as local NHS organisations work with their partners to turn the ambitions in the plan into improvements in services across the country.


Published: 21st August 2019

Source: NHS UK

Page URL: https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/publication/nhs-long-term-plan/

NHS Long Term Plan – Easy Read Version

NHS Long Term Plan – Easy Read Version

The NHS is one of Britain’s greatest achievements and for 70 years its dedicated staff has been there for us.
A lot has changed since it was created in 1948, and today the NHS is responding to changes in society that were never expected, let alone planned for.

The Government has announced additional funding for the NHS and this means we can plan to make the NHS fit for the future for patients, their families and our staff.

The NHS Long Term Plan will make sure the NHS has a bright future ahead of it. We know that families work hard to pay their taxes and that’s why we will make sure every penny is invested on the things that matter most, from providing high quality lifesaving treatment and care for our patients and their families, to reducing pressure on our hard working NHS staff and investing in exciting new technologies.

The NHS Long Term Plan was developed in partnership with those who know the NHS best – frontline health and care staff, patients and their families and other experts.


Published: 21st August 2019

Source: NHS UK

Page URL: https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/publication/nhs-long-term-plan/